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Wraping Up

When a former member of one of the CEN groups landed a job after a long search, he said, “I know I am just between searches and I will be much better prepared next time.”

Congratulations – you’ve done it. You planned, launched and carried out a successful marketing campaign and are now getting ready to start your new job. In this chapter we will discuss the basic steps of tying up all the loose ends and getting started on the right foot in your new job and at the same time keeping your network going and growing.



First and immediately, contact any employers who may have given you offers and let them know that you have elected to accept another offer. Thank them for the opportunity and compliment them on their organization. Do not mention any negatives but rather state something about the greater opportunity at your new company. Follow up your phone conversation with a letter. Also get in touch immediately with all other companies and recruiters/executive search firms with whom you have been talking about specific situations.

Second, take good care of your network. If everything has gone well during your search, you have strengthened your network and were probably introduced to your new job through this network. Let your entire network know where you are going, what you will be doing and how you can be reached. Perhaps you cannot call everyone, especially if you have a very large network, but you can, in this day of mail merge, easily send a letter to everyone. Include those outside your network whom you have called as follow up to a mailing. If you already have your new business cards be sure to include one in each letter.

Third, relax. Depending upon available time and money, take a vacation, long weekend or at least enjoy a fine dinner at your favorite restaurant. You have earned it.
Lastly, stay in touch with your network. There are no rules. It depends on the relationship. The foundation of your network is trust, respect and mutual interest be it occupation, or whatever. Many who have never cultivated a network before do so when they lose a job and then forget to keep it alive. You may need your network again for another job search. Your fledgling network is too valuable to let wither. Continue to nourish it.
Keep your network intact and growing. You will want to keep this network in place and continue to grow it, not just in case you should need to look for another job anytime soon (though that is a real possibility) but also as a network to tap into whenever you need information or the occasional favor.

Getting started on the new job

The biggest adjustment in a new job for most people is having to earn your stripes all over again. If you have previously been with just one employer and with them for many years then you do not even remember how long you were there before people started paying attention to you and your ideas. You are now in a new company and you will have to prove yourself all over again.
The length of time necessary to earn your stripes at your new company is primarily a function of the average tenure of the current management team. If the president or division manager has been with the company for 35 years and the other management has been with the company an average of fifteen years then you can be pretty sure to be considered the new person on the block for two or three years. If, however, the president has been there fifteen months and half the others on the management team have been there two years or less you will have your stripes before your probation period is over. Just pace yourself and be aware of whether your ideas are rocking the boat or being welcomed.
The other variable which influences the length of time to earn your stripes is the type of business you are in. If you are changing industries the type of business you have joined may also affect the length of time it takes to earn your stripes. A major factor is the level at which most decisions are made. For example, retail merchandising requires many more basic decisions than aircraft manufacturing and therefore retailing allows the new manager to make decisions far faster.
One of the biggest sins is failing to assimilate into the new company. You are no longer at ABC Company and they do not particularly want to hear your old war stories at ABC Company. Perhaps the biggest sin of all is to seem to forget who you work for now as in: “We do it this way….!” You have been traded and they want you on their team or not at all.
Your new organization has a different culture than your last company. One of the main differences is their stage of automating, meeting the challenges of a global economy and reengineering its organization. Of course there are many other differences. One of your many tasks at this early stage of your assimilating into the new culture is to discern where the organization is developmentally and then determine the direction and speed of their change. What is important? What is unimportant? You can often look to your new boss for direction and guidance but not without being sure he or she has it right. Build a network within the new organization and use the informal organization to your advantage.


Career Planning for the Future

As you begin your new job and new company, keep in mind you will probably not finish your career at this company. The reality is that the computer revolution and increased international trade will mean continuous change. You must look out for yourself. This does not mean you should not be a team player. Quite the contrary. Teamwork is vital to success. But you must also continuously check on your own situation and not let your growth slow down or your stability wither.
So, how do you go about protecting your career? First of all you must stay flexible. Flexibility mean going with the flow of new corporate goals and strategies, new technology, new market conditions, etc.
Secondly, it means looking out for yourself so that you are never again “in the wrong place at the right time.” That means you must be willing to do what is best for you – looking out for the best interests of yourself and your financial well-being. Consider the 99% rule…

The 99% Rule

Traditional thinking says to give 100% to your employer.
Perhaps it would be better for everyone to be sure that he or she is in the best position and, if not, change jobs and/or companies.
Give the first one percent to yourself
From time to time, at least once each year, take some time to determine if you are in the right function, division, organization, industry, etc. If you are, then give the rest of your concentration to the job. If you are not in the right spot, do something about it. Give the first 1% to yourself and the next 99% to the company. Giving 99% in the right job produces more for the company and the individual than giving 110% in the wrong job.
If more people followed this advice, there may be more job change but more people would end up in the “right spot.” The company also wins because a greater percentage of their employees would be better suited to their jobs and working in their area of “motivated strength.” Everyone wins.

Managing Your Own Career

Gone are the days of a company taking a large part in the career planning of its employees – at least to the degree that it used to exist when employees generally stayed with a company for long periods, often for their entire career.
Under the old system an employee would accept a new assignment without giving much thought as to how it would impact a career search should they be forced to, or wish to, launch a job search with that job at the top of their resume.
It matters a great deal more now when no one knows how the situation may change, sometimes with lightning speed. Therefore you must be prepared at all times and always growing your network and improving your technical and management skills.
If you assume this responsibility for yourself several things will happen:
You will be more valuable to your current employer and less likely to suffer during a cut-back.
If you are ever caught in a cut back again, you will be more marketable.
You will also be better able to mount an effective job search campaign since you will have a strong network in place.

Best luck to you for a successful future.

By the way, have you thanked God for His help during your search?
And ask yourself how you can help other job searchers in the future. Maybe you can even become a volunteer and/or a job search coach for one of the CEN member parish job search groups? Think about it – think about how you can help others.
Pass along any job openings you hear of at your new employer or elsewhere. These leads will help other job seekers find their ideal job. You can pass them along to whichever parish job search
group(s) you belong to or send them to Shirley Valentino so they can be included in the AEN newsletter.
And remember to refer CEN and catholicemploymentnetwork.org to others.



Job Search

CEN is offering information on jobs in the St Louis area.


December 2017 Calendar list of Job Fairs and Support Meetings in the St Louis Area
On The Job Training Open Positions St Louis OJT positions posted by SLATE - American Job Center
On-The-Job-Training Missouri Job Centers offer On-The-Job-Training to help businesses reduce training costs
St Louis OJT Job Openings Jobs posted in www.jobs.mo.gov
Search Job Listings Search our online job listings
Employers Post a job on our free online job service
Virtual Career Library Virtual website resource for job seekers
CEN News

St. Gerard Majella

What: SGM CEN NETWORK
Career Development Series
Career Search for the Unemployed and Underemployed
When: September 19, 7:15-8:30pm
Where: St Gerard Majella
Catholic Church Building 2005,
Parish Meeting Room 224
1971 Dougherty Ferry Rd
St.Louis, MO 63122
Please join us at our next Career Development Workshop, where Kathy Bernard will help those who are currently looking for work, as well as anyone looking to advance their career or transition into another field. Her subjects will include:
  1. Writing resumes that sail through Applicant Tracking Systems.
  2. Using LinkedIn for branding, research and reaching recruiters and hiring managers.
  3. Networking effectively
  4. Salary negotiation.
Kathy Bernard is the CEO of WiserU, LLC, as well as a LinkedIn expert and career coach. She trains companies and individuals to maximize LinkedIn for sales, marketing, recruiting, or job search. Additionally, Kathy is the creator of the groundbreaking WiserU Career System, which trains participants precisely how to land and excel at high-paying jobs. Kathy has personally career coached 1,000+ job seekers, reached over 1.2 million people through her popular WiserUTips.com blog and led more than 500 weekly webinars on JobTransition.TV.

We hope you will join us so we can continue to help and support each other! If you have questions, please contact us at St Gerard Magella. There is never any cost for our service.

Holy Spirit


CEN welcomes Holy Spirit, Maryland Heights, as their newest CEN parish, offering support for employment seekers. If you are looking for work or would like to volunteer your help for our newest startup, contact Jeff Pattison, 314-853-6197.

CEN Parish Support


All job seekers are invited to contact any CEN parish for job support information. Just check links under Parishes.